The system of Peace

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Peace does not mean that there is no conflict or problem in our living spaces that requires hard work to resolve. Peace means that in the midst of challenges, we are able to remain calm even in difficult life situations and participate openly, constructively and creatively in the joint creation of alternatives to solutions.

A biosystematic interpretation of the phenomenon of peace provides a framework for my conflict and problem-solving processes that help recognize and raise awareness of stress responses in awkward or difficult situations that cause stagnation and provide simple, practical tools to resolve them, thus moving stakeholders to peace. Solutions.

Threatening life situations during a conflict can cause physical reactions in those affected, during which their organization can run the following self-directed preparedness programs: combat, escape, and freeze. In such situations, tension and stress relief techniques gently direct the nervous system toward completing self-defense motor reactions, the dissolution of blocked resources, and the embodiment of a state of peace in both the body and the relationship (s).

The bottom-up systemic transformation of stress is a natural process that we must go through to create a state of peace in ourselves and our relationships.

 

 

The state of peace

We are safe, open and connected

Feelings

Balance,

Grounding,

Sense of safe,

Focus,

Sympathy,

Courage,

Satisfaction,

Connection,

Optimism,

Flow,

Respect,

Beautiful,

Love,

Hope,

Joy

Body sensations

Calm heartbeat,

Soft, expressive look

Deep regular breathing,

Open body language,

Loose body position,

Rhythmic and playful tone changes,

Hearing is attuned to human voices

Behavior

Safe touch and intimacy,

Expressive movements,

Relationship with nature,

Conscious presence,

Meditation,

Prayer,

Art and music,

Cooperation,

Mutual dialogue,

Problem solving,

Creative thinking

The state of threat activates stress reactions

Creating a sense of security solves stress reactions

The state of the fight/ flight/ fawn

We fight, run away or please

Feelings

Excessive motivation,

Excitement,

Anger,

Frustration,

Annoyance,

Disgust,

Hate,

Crisis,

Stress,

Anxiety,

Fear,

Desire to quit

Body sensations

Fast heartbeat,

Startled look

Rapid shallow breathing,

Fast monotonous speech,

Loose body position,

Bad hearing,

Muscle stiffness or pain

Intestinal dysfunction,

Hunched posture,

High activity,

Increased alertness,

Hyperfocus

Behavior

Powerful gestures and movements,

Intense crying,

Shouting,

Tremor,

Escape,

Avoiding social contacts,

Dominance,

Aggression,

Control,

Lie,

Violence

Freeze state

We block and get stuck

Feelings

Shame,

Grief,

Confusion,

Shipping,

Weakening,

Flooding,

Terror,

Danger to life,

Extreme anxiety,

Unworthiness,

Hopelessness,

Disconnection,

Emptiness

Body sensations

Weak pulse,

Cold, pale skin,

Disintegrated or closed posture,

Downward gaze

Low blood pressure,

Stuttering,

Higher tolerance to pain,

Numbness,

Stiffness;

Immobility,

Nausea

Behavior

Insulation,

Memory loss,

Dissociation ,

Lack of exercise or movement attack,

Quiet crying

Lack of motivation,

Drowsiness,

Self-abuse,

Catastrophic thinking,

Collapse,

Faint

The figure was inspired by Janae Elisabeth’s polyvagal ladder , which I supplemented with the knowledge and experience of my biosystemic studies .